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9642 Randle Rd
Williamsport, OH, 43164

Honeyrun Farm produces pure raw, honey, handcrafted soap, and beeswax candles in Williamsport, Ohio

Five Frame Nuc- Pickup 5/2/17

2018 Wholesale Nucs

Purchase must be 30 or more nucs. $110- Half now, half due at pick-up. 

Disregard the 2017 pick-up dates and prices. 

We will have 400-600 available by early May. Over 200 are already spoken for. If interested, call Isaac (740) 225-2462

-Our five framers come in a deep wooden nuc box. (No mediums available.)

-This durable, ventilated, leak-proof box can be used as a future swarm catcher, or provide a handy means of making a split for your coming apiary endeavors.

-The nuc itself will consist of a young laying queen, three frames of brood in various stages, one foundation frame being drawn, and one feed frame of honey and pollen. Five frames total, bursting with overwintered bees from here in central Ohio.

-Queen will be placed and nucs will be monitored 2-3 weeks before the pick-up date.

-All nucs will be marked as to the origin of the queen. There will be a variety available, but we cannot take requests. More details below, just click on the pick-up date of your choosing.

Five Frame Nuc- Pickup 5/2/17

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sold out

Five Frame Nuc- Pickup 5/2/17

80.00

-The total cost for this item is $160.00.  This payment of $80 secures your deposit.  The next $80.00 payment will be due in full at time of pick-up. Credit card or cash. If you prefer to pay with a check, we need to receive your payment at least one week prior to the pick-up date.

-Nuc must be picked up at our farm between the hours of 7 am and 10 am.

Description

-The nuc itself will consist of three frames of brood in various stages, one foundation frame being drawn out and one feed frame of honey and pollen.

-The brood and bees come from our own central Ohio hives. Queens come from four proven breeders we have used over the years:

                            Rossman Apiaries- GA Italians, Latshaw genetics

                            Koehnen & Sons- CA Carniolans

                            JJ Honey- GA Italian, Carniolan mix, “Red Pin”

                            Noel Tinoco- CA Carniolans

-Although we plan on producing a couple hundred of our own Ohio queens, these will not be included in the nuc mix until mid to late May. (If at all.)

For those that would like a larger quantity, we offer the "Bee Club Special" - Buy 30 or more, $130.00 each.  Please email us at info<@>honeyrunfarm.com to schedule payment.

 

Why a nuc may fit the bill:

-Unlike a package, a nuc is basically an established hive. It consists of a growing brood nest, has drawn comb, stored honey and pollen, and most importantly a young laying queen has been accepted. You are buying a strong little power pack of bees, ready to explode into spring.

-If you are interested in honey production or even expanding your apiary with future splits, a nuc is the way to go. You are getting a jump on the season. (Approximately a month head start on a package.)

-Nucs take away some of the risk. The dangers of getting started are often exaggerated with package bees through no fault of the beekeeper. Supercedure issues can arise when you combine a young mated queen with unrelated loose bees, pheromones unfamiliar to all. And often a new beekeeper is installing this collection of confused bees into a new hive body containing frames of undrawn foundation. This can amplify problems further when the introduced queen has no place to lay eggs.

 

A Few Side Notes:

-The nucs should be transferred into your larger equipment within a week of pick-up. Spring growth seems almost exponential, and they will soon be running out of room!

-The nucs will be split from colonies NOT involved in apple pollination. We take around 150 colonies into the apples every spring. These bees are subjected to transport stress and certain years, orchard fungicides. We will not be selling brood from these colonies.

-I have been asked about our methods of mite treatment. We have managed our colonies without the use of hard chemicals, however, we DO treat. Please keep in mind, you are not buying mite resistant bees! Last year our treatment schedule went like this:

            March / April - Apiguard (thymol)

            June - MAQS (formic acid)

            August - MAQS (formic acid)

            October -  MAQS (formic acid)

            December - Oxalic acid vapor

You will be getting bees that are relatively mite free, but any experienced beekeeper will tell you that this holiday won’t last forever. You need to explore treatment options by mid to late summer. Monitoring helps! A nuc can become a monster honey producer in June. It can also become a dwindling, mite-infested scourge by late September. Just the hard reality of modern beekeeping.

-But another reality of modern beekeeping is that it’s a wonderful endeavor! It takes a little knowledge, a little skill and maybe some luck, but it’s one of the most rewarding things you’ll ever do. Good luck!

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